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Thread: The Golf MKV R32 to R36

  1. #1
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    Post The Golf MKV R32 to R36

    After two and a half years of delay the project begins on my Golf MKV R32 to a R36.
    The project has been completed successfully and I'll be documenting the process here from beginning to end.

    Getting ready to strip the motor out.



    While the motor is out and getting some attention, a good opportunity to clean the engine bay.




    Changing the rear badge from R32 to R36.


    If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.


  2. #2
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    nice work!

    should be pretty much plug and play with some tricks needed for fuelling.

    look forward to more posts.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanPGonzaga View Post
    nice work!

    should be pretty much plug and play with some tricks needed for fuelling.

    look forward to more posts.
    Thanks. Yip on the wiring side for the ECU and to setup a fuel control unit for the fueling side would need some "tricks".
    The mechanical parts (engine, gearbox, exhaust, etc...) is just a simple bolt up with no modifications.

    The engine bay.



    The R36 project has been completed on the 31 Dec 2018, so a good way to end 2018.

    This is something that VW should have done in the first place, but they just simply cheaped out.
    I'll post all the details of the build, or should I say swap, including plenty of pictures.

    But for now I need to confess that I was busy on another project before this R36 project.
    That project made this R36 project happen.

    Click on The CC Story for more details and more pictures.
    If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.


  4. #4
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    The front end and Polar Fis display



    More details will come through with more pictures.
    If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.


  5. #5
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    This stuff really floats my boat....
    Really enjoy reading about the journeys that people take to get to a satisfying end like you have. Makes it seem so easy when it's distilled into a few pics and words when we all know it takes dedication, effort, time, skill, patience, money and a little madness to accomplish something like this

    Now....videos please!
    2011 Skoda Octavia vRS TDI DSG wagon|Revo Stage 1|Race Blue|Leather|Dynamic Xenons w 6000K|9w7 BT|THA475 Amp+active sub|Whiteline ALK|RVC|
    2009 R36 wagon|Biscay Blue|RVC|Tailgate|ECU and DSG tune|LED DRL/Indicators|3D colour cluster|Quad LED tail rings|Climatronics upgrade|Dynaudio retrofit|B7 RLine Flat Steering Wheel|3AA CCM|TPMS Direct|B7 Adaptive Cruise with Front Assist|Discover Media retrofit|PLA 2.0|Lane Assist|BCM retrofit|High Beam Assist|DQ500

  6. #6
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    Here's some video clips for the R36.
    Going up a steep hill:


    Idle/rev in the garage:


    The engine check light is on due to no catalytic converters. The ECU stock software needs to be updated.
    If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.


  7. #7
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    Give us more!!!!
    Never get tired of a nice vr6 exhaust note The Golf MKV R32 to R36
    2011 Skoda Octavia vRS TDI DSG wagon|Revo Stage 1|Race Blue|Leather|Dynamic Xenons w 6000K|9w7 BT|THA475 Amp+active sub|Whiteline ALK|RVC|
    2009 R36 wagon|Biscay Blue|RVC|Tailgate|ECU and DSG tune|LED DRL/Indicators|3D colour cluster|Quad LED tail rings|Climatronics upgrade|Dynaudio retrofit|B7 RLine Flat Steering Wheel|3AA CCM|TPMS Direct|B7 Adaptive Cruise with Front Assist|Discover Media retrofit|PLA 2.0|Lane Assist|BCM retrofit|High Beam Assist|DQ500

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamold View Post
    Give us more!!!!
    Never get tired of a nice vr6 exhaust note The Golf MKV R32 to R36
    Yip, I also never get tired of the VR6 exhaust sounds.
    Once I get a better quality camera I'll do some driving around sounds.


    Since I'm basically finished in posting the main details of my CC I can concentrate a bit on this.

    Getting ready to remove the 3.2L engine.


    Before disconnecting the aircon radiator and it's piping I did a quick cleanup.
    The was a small seepage of oil from one of the valves. The valve needs to be replaced.


    After a quick cleanup.


    The ME7 ECU that needs to be taken out, with it's engine wiring harness.



    The back view of the VR6 3.2 motor and gearbox, once out of the engine bay.



    Engine bay needed some cleaning.


    The engine bay all nice and clean.
    Ready to receive the 3.6L engine.


    The 3.2L at the front and the 3.6L engine at the background.


    The 3.6L installed.


    I was toying with the idea of using the R32 gearbox since it is a close ratio gearbox.
    After a while, I made a decision to use the 3.6L gearbox, since I do some long distance driving.

    The first three gears (1st, 2nd and 3rd gears) ratio, of 3.6L gearbox, is almost identical to the R32 gearbox ratios.
    From fourth and upwards of the 3.6L has longer gear ratios that the R32 gearbox.
    With highway speeds, in sixth gear, the R32 sits way above the 3000rpm mark.
    At the same highway speeds the 3.6L sixth gear sits around the 2500rpm mark, which is a big difference.

    More later on.
    If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.


  9. #9
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    Once the 3.6L motor was installed, it gives me an opportunity to strip off the inlet manifolds to view the carbon build up on the inlet valves.
    This VR6 has done 150 000Km and it is the direct injection (FSI) motor.

    Stripped the top part of the inlet manifold off.


    Here's the three front part of the inlet ports:




    The three back part of the inlet ports:



    They are not too bad for the mileage, but they needed to be cleaned.

    So walnut shells are needed to do the cleaning. It wasn't easy to find.
    Someone told me that they got the nut shells from a gun shop.

    So I went and bought some nut shells from a gun shop.
    Also needed other equipment, 50L compressor, gravity feed sandblaster, carburetor cleaner, vacuum cleaner with some old vacuum cleaner hoses, etc..:


    I was lucky to have a few 7mm aluminum tubes laying around.
    Bought some extra nozzles, drilled the holes bigger and fitted the aluminum tubes onto the nozzles.
    The top curvy one was used to get into the back ports in the head. I really struggled in cleaning those ports.
    The bottom straight one was used for the front ports and that was easy to clean.


    I also used this cheap USB bore camera to help me to view the back ports while cleaning.


    Taped up the ports and left the port open that I was cleaning.


    This is about 15-20 second squirt from the sand blasting gun with the nut shells.


    After a couple of minutes of blasting and a round with the carburetor cleaner.

    Just one more round with the carburetor cleaner and the port cleaning is done.

    The back ports cleaned out and waiting for a last round with the carburetor cleaner.


    I really struggled to get the back ports cleaned out properly.
    It was difficult to get in there with the aluminum tube, but with some persistence I eventually got it cleaned out properly.

    I use an old vacuum cleaner hose, which I cut into a short length and made a small hole for the aluminum tube to fit through.
    The old vacuum cleaner hose was just big enough to fit into the inlet ports.
    This old hose was connected to my old vacuum cleaner and the area was kept clean from the nut shells spraying around.
    One advise on the vacuum cleaner, either use a low power one or if yours is a variable power type, like mine, set it towards the lowest setting.
    At higher suction power I actually started to draw out the oil from the valve stem seals.

    Used a strainer to separate the bigger carbon pieces from the nut shells so I can reuse the nut shells.


    This is how much nut shells I've used.

    I lost count after 15-16 times of reusing the nut shells.
    So the 3Kg nut shells would do a few cars (4 cylinder).

    Installing the seal kit onto the injector.


    The top half of the inlet manifold cleaned out with new seals, ready to be installed.
    If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.


  10. #10
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    Once the inlet manifold was installed another area I had to tackle was an oil seepage from the sump seal.


    The sump dropped.


    The internals looks very clean for the mileage done.


    The sump all cleaned up and ready for the install.


    Next up is the exhaust install and the wiring.
    If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.


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