DNA Tuning (Australia)

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Vehicle modifications legality [NSW]

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    3
    Users Country Flag

    Vehicle modifications legality [NSW]

    Hello,

    I own a 2018 Golf R which I am interested in modifying. As this will be my first time modifying a vehicle I wish to ensure I meet the legal requirements.

    At this stage, I am planning on performing the following modifications:

    • Cold air intake
    • Turbo inlet pipe
    • Rear sway bar

    I would be replacing exisiting stock parts with performance/uprated parts purchased from Australian suppliers.

    According to Vehicle standards information No. 6 Rev 3 issued by Transport NSW, significant modifications to a light vehicle require certification under the Vehicle Safety Compliance Certification Scheme (VSCCS).

    See the full VSI document here: https://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/documents...ifications.pdf

    Relevant excerpts from the VSI pertaining to my upgrades are as follows:

    Quote Originally Posted by VSI 6, pg. 3
    ENGINE
    Fitting of turbochargers or superchargers not originally offered by the engine or vehicle manufacturer, or increasing the original power output by more than 20%.
    Examples requiring certification:
    • Fitting a turbocharger/supercharger to any vehicle of a make and model not offered with a turbocharger/supercharger by the manufacturer.
    • Modifications to a vehicle with a power output of 100 kilowatts, which results in a power output of greater than 120 kilowatts.
    No change to factory fitted turbo. Increase in power from upgrades is less than 20% (20% of 213kW = 42.6kW). Therefore no certification required for turbo inlet pipe.


    Quote Originally Posted by VSI 6, pg. 4
    ENGINE (continued)
    Modification to engines and/or exhausts that impacts* the emissions levels applicable to those ADRs specified for the vehicle.
    * ’impacts’ means an increase in emissions levels specified in the ADRs.
    Examples not requiring certification:
    • Alternative engine intake and filtration systems that retain the original emission control equipment eg replacement filter elements/assemblies, intercoolers, cold air intakes, snorkels.
    No emission control equipment is fitted to the cold air intake on the R. Therefore no certification required for cold air intake.


    Quote Originally Posted by VSI 6, pg. 7
    SUSPENSION
    Examples not requiring certification:
    • Fitting uprated roll (sway) bars, shock absorbers, springs, struts or manufacturer’s options for that particular year make and model.
    I would be purchasing a sway bar that fits the particular year, make, and model of my vehicle. Therefore no certification required for rear sway bar.


    My understanding from the VSI, is that my proposed modifications are not deemed significant and therefore do not require certification. Is this correct?
    Would I be able to perform the works myself or do I need to get a mechanic to perform the work?
    Are highway patrol or RMS likely to question/defect the modifications?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    535
    You are correct in your understanding of the VSI, the modifications you have indicated will not require a certificate of modification.

    Where it is suggested to have any work performed by qualified and licenced tradespersons, you are able to do the work yourself in NSW.

    HP/RMS are unlikely to take an interest in your vehicle if it displays no physical signs of modifications, such as parts sticking out or excess noise and is in a roadworthy condition. You could however be liable if you are involved in an accident and because of the modifications to your vehicle it has varied the way the vehicle was manufactured to operate - such as to increased power without brakes being able to support it.

    Any modifications should be communicated to your insurance provider to ensure you are covered there. Normally they will not worry (enough to increase your premium) for minor upgrades.
    Last edited by Flipper Dog; 04-01-2021 at 11:02 AM.
    Flipper Dog
    Now - T-Roc 140TSI, Audi Q5 40TDI
    Past VWs- Golf 6, 7 and 7.5, Touareg 2 and 3, a Passat, and a couple of various Polos

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kilsyth, VIC
    Posts
    6,217
    Users Country Flag
    This is a whole world of hurt that doesn't have a good answer and can be down to the interpretation of the person on the day. Some things are really clearly spelled out, like wheels, but other things are not. Many of the rules are very old and not so applicable to modern FI engines too (like the 20% which is easily achievable with nothing more than a tune). There is often debate over who has to prove things meet (or don't meet) standards, the authority or the user... The reality is they hold the fine/defect book and the rest is up to you.

    I spoke to an engineer (years ago now) who said that lots of things these days really come down to emissions including intake, exhaust and tunes. The old 20% power upgrade used to be partly to ensure that when adding power the rest of the car could handle it. He was saying that these days modern cars would walk in the various old tests like braking and already have seat belts and air bags and all the safety features.

    So technically anyone with a tune needs to have the car re-emissions tested to make sure it still meets the required standard (and it would be nice if companies pre-engineered their tunes).

    In reality, if you're not making noise or hooning about there is no reason anyone would want to look at the car and nothing you've mentioned sounds like it would raise any eyebrows... but what do I know

    Very sadly, no one can give you a definitive answer on these things except the relevant authority and good luck with that.


    If it has an engine or heartbeat it's going to cost you. | Getflix

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    3
    Users Country Flag Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Flipper Dog View Post
    You are correct in your understanding of the VSI, the modifications you have indicated will not require a certificate of modification.

    Where it is suggested to have any work performed by qualified and licenced tradespersons, you are able to do the work yourself in NSW.

    HP/RMS are unlikely to take an interest in your vehicle if it displays no physical signs of modifications, such as parts sticking out or excess noise and is in a roadworthy condition. You could however be liable if you are involved in an accident and because of the modifications to your vehicle it has varied the way the vehicle was manufactured to operate - such as to increased power without brakes being able to support it.

    Any modifications should be communicated to your insurance provider to ensure you are covered there. Normally they will not worry (enough to increase your premium) for minor upgrades.
    Thanks Flipper Dog for your detailed response, much appreciated.

    Yes, I will be informing my insurance provider of the modifications.


    Quote Originally Posted by The_Hawk View Post
    This is a whole world of hurt that doesn't have a good answer and can be down to the interpretation of the person on the day. Some things are really clearly spelled out, like wheels, but other things are not. Many of the rules are very old and not so applicable to modern FI engines too (like the 20% which is easily achievable with nothing more than a tune). There is often debate over who has to prove things meet (or don't meet) standards, the authority or the user... The reality is they hold the fine/defect book and the rest is up to you.

    I spoke to an engineer (years ago now) who said that lots of things these days really come down to emissions including intake, exhaust and tunes. The old 20% power upgrade used to be partly to ensure that when adding power the rest of the car could handle it. He was saying that these days modern cars would walk in the various old tests like braking and already have seat belts and air bags and all the safety features.

    So technically anyone with a tune needs to have the car re-emissions tested to make sure it still meets the required standard (and it would be nice if companies pre-engineered their tunes).

    In reality, if you're not making noise or hooning about there is no reason anyone would want to look at the car and nothing you've mentioned sounds like it would raise any eyebrows... but what do I know

    Very sadly, no one can give you a definitive answer on these things except the relevant authority and good luck with that.
    Thanks Hawk for this perspective of the situation and I do agree that the onus will likely fall on the user to prove the works meet standards. I have found that RMS offer free emissions testing so I will get that done post-upgrades to verify the vehicle is still complaint.
    Last edited by golfSE; 04-01-2021 at 12:45 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kilsyth, VIC
    Posts
    6,217
    Users Country Flag

    Quote Originally Posted by golfSE View Post
    I have found that RMS offer free emissions testing so I will get that done post-upgrades to verify the vehicle is still complaint.
    You'd be the first person I know that has voluntarily done that! Will be interesting to see how it goes, more interesting if there was a before and after. Theoretically at least more flow = more fuel and more power and more emissions???


    If it has an engine or heartbeat it's going to cost you. | Getflix

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
| |